Did The Grand Ronde Tribes Get Paid for all Their Ceded Lands?

Between 1853 and 1855 the federal government negotiated treaties with the Tribes who came to the Grand Ronde Indian Reservation. These tribes were promised what amounted to hundreds of thousands of dollars in money, services, security and a permanent reservation forever. I have already established in other essays that the tribes were not correctly paid… Read More Did The Grand Ronde Tribes Get Paid for all Their Ceded Lands?

Repealing National Monuments? Why Tribal People Should Care!

Mr. Trump has ordered a review of many National Monuments that are protected under the Antiquities Act of 1906. The law was enacted in 1906 to prevent looting of Indian artifacts from archaeological sites. The act has mostly been used since then by presidents to turn public land into national monuments protected forever from commercial… Read More Repealing National Monuments? Why Tribal People Should Care!

The Land is Our Heart: Protect the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument

The Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument spans more than 66,000 acres of forest lands in southern Oregon and Northern California. These are the traditional homelands of the Takelmans, Athapaskans, Shastans, and Klamath peoples. The Rogue River tribes, as they are known today at Grand Ronde and Siletz reservations, were the Takelma, Athapaskan, Shasta and some Umpqua tribes… Read More The Land is Our Heart: Protect the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument

Equability of the Willamette Valley Treaty

Three days after signing the Willamette Valley Treaty (January 20, 1855) with the tribes of the Willamette Valley and Columbia River, Joel Palmer Superintendent of Indian Affairs for Oregon,  sent the treaty to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, Manypenny. Palmer sent with the treaty an accompanying letter explaining the treaty and documenting the other promises… Read More Equability of the Willamette Valley Treaty

This Place is as My Heart: The 1855 Wasco-Deschutes Treaty

In 1855, Joel Palmer met with the Wasco and Deschutes tribes to convince them to sign the treaty and remove to the proposed Warm Springs Reservation. The chief of the tribes spoke powerfully about their love of their land, calling their fish, gathering and hunting places  like the parts of their heart. The tribes knew… Read More This Place is as My Heart: The 1855 Wasco-Deschutes Treaty

I Have Only One Talk: The Dog Rivers Refuse to Remove

At the June 1855 treaty meeting of the Deschutes, Wascoes, and Walla Wallas, there were also the Dog River Cascades. They are listed on the transcript as being there but apparently never spoke publicly at the gathering. Various letters by Palmer and others suggest that they remained on their lands for several years beyond the… Read More I Have Only One Talk: The Dog Rivers Refuse to Remove

Help fund My Book Project: Tribal Stories of the Willamette Valley

  Tribal Stories of the Willamette Valley This project is born from this website. Over the past three years I have been writing essays about the Iribal histories of Oregon. I am bringing together about 20 of these stories into a book project. The project will rewrite the tribe histories and help everyone understand what… Read More Help fund My Book Project: Tribal Stories of the Willamette Valley

The First Grand Ronde Indian Legislature and Laws, Beginning in 1873

The following documents are part of the Siletz Reservation Collection at the Oregon Historical Society Library in Portland. They were found in around 2010 by myself, and copies recovered for the Grand Ronde tribe. They were digitized for the library about a year later  through a loan to the Oregon State University Archives, with all… Read More The First Grand Ronde Indian Legislature and Laws, Beginning in 1873

Priming the Powderkeg: Table Rock area in 1855

In 1853 there had occurred the Rogue River War. That war was likely caused by continued encroachment into tribal lands by settlers, and the failure of the federal government to ratify the first Oregon treaties. Joel Palmer arrives at work in 1853 and immediately begins in southern Oregon because of the active war happening there… Read More Priming the Powderkeg: Table Rock area in 1855